About Kristina Wyatt

Kristina is an Elementary Education student at Baker College. Her love for children begins with her own four little ones: Roxie, Eden, Robbie, and Vanna. When she is not focused on her studies or spending time with her family, she loves photography, graphic design, and web development.

Nutrition Labels (5th grade lesson plan)

Health Education unit consisting of three coordinating lesson plans.

Lesson Plan Title

Nutrition Labels – Reading and Deciphering

Course

Grade 5 Health Education

Total Class Time

30 minutes

Objective(s) the students will be able to:

  • Read food labels and find nutritional values.
  • Differentiate between healthy and unhealthy foods based upon their nutritional value.

Standard(s)

1.3         Demonstrate the ability to use information on food labels to choose nutrient-dense foods and beverages, and to avoid or limit foods and beverages that are low in nutrients or may impact health conditions.

1.4         Prepare meal plans according to the federal dietary guidelines.

Material Needed

  • Food labels cut from various food packages.
  • Federal dietary guidelines for nutrition.

Lesson Procedure

  1. Begin lesson by asking students: “How do we find a food’s nutritional value?  How do we tell if it is healthy for us or not?”
  2. Pass out food labels to students.  Allow time for students to study the labels.
  3. Ask students to share their findings: how much sugar does their food have?  How much salt?
  4. Using the information pulled from the federal dietary guidelines, explain the recommended allowances of sugar, salt, and et cetera with the students.
  5. Ask the students to raise their hands if any of their foods exceed or come close to the recommended allowances.
  6. Determine as a class which labels fall into a “healthy” category and which fall into an “unhealthy” category.

Lesson Continuation

For homework and for the next lesson, ask the students to find their favorite food in their homes.
Each student will cut out the food label to bring to class.
Each student should find the sugar content and, with the help of an adult if needed, measure that amount of sugar into a Ziploc bag to bring to class.
Students should use a sharpie marker to label on the Ziploc bag what the food item is, and how much sugar is in the bag.

 


 

Lesson Plan Title

Nutrition Labels – Favorite Foods

Course

Grade 5 Health Education

Total Class Time

30 minutes

Objective(s) the students will be able to

  • Read food labels and find nutritional values.
  • Differentiate between healthy and unhealthy foods based upon their nutritional value.
  • Compare and contrast sugar content in foods.

Standard(s)

1.3         Demonstrate the ability to use information on food labels to choose nutrient-dense foods and beverages, and to avoid or limit foods and beverages that are low in nutrients or may impact health conditions.

1.4         Prepare meal plans according to the federal dietary guidelines.

Material Needed

  • Students’ individual food labels brought from home; the teacher should bring one as well for an example.
  • Ziploc bag of sugar coordinating with the chosen food label.
  • A large surface.

Lesson Procedure

  1. Begin lesson by showing the bag of sugar brought by the teacher, explaining the amount, and describing the food item it is found in.  Have the students discuss whether or not the amount of sugar constitutes if the food is healthy or unhealthy.
  2. Allow students to, one by one, share their sugar content.  As a class, decided which are healthy and unhealthy.
  3. Most students will probably categorize their favorite foods into the unhealthy category as most foods contain sugar.  Discuss with the students how a food may contain sugar yet still be considered healthy.
  4. On a large surface, sort the Ziploc bags of sugar in order by least to most sugar.  Have students compare which foods have the least sugar versus which have the most.
  5. Have students turn in the food label cut outs of their favorite foods for the next lesson.

 


 

Lesson Plan Title

Nutrition Labels – Make a Menu

Course

Grade 5 Health Education

Total Class Time

30 minutes

Objective(s) the students will be able to:

  • Read food labels and find nutritional values.
  • Differentiate between healthy and unhealthy foods based upon their nutritional value.
  • Create a menu based upon federal dietary guidelines.
  • Learn how to make good food choices as well as the concept of moderation.

Standard(s)

1.3         Demonstrate the ability to use information on food labels to choose nutrient-dense foods and beverages, and to avoid or limit foods and beverages that are low in nutrients or may impact health conditions.

1.4         Prepare meal plans according to the federal dietary guidelines.

Material Needed

  • Several food labels cut from various food packages, or created mock-ups of food labels.
  • Federal dietary guidelines for nutrition printouts.
  • Paper and pencils.

Lesson Procedure

  1. Begin lesson by passing back the students’ favorite food nutrition labels from the previous lessons and a printout of the federal dietary guidelines.
  2. Review the federal dietary guidelines and discuss the recommended intake values for students their age.  Values should include (but are not limited to) sugar, salt, carbohydrates, fats, protein, vegetables, fruits, and et cetera.
  3. Separate students into groups of five.  Using the food labels or mock-ups, give each group several to choose from.  Instruct the groups to create a day’s menu.  Their menus should follow the dietary guidelines and recommended intake amounts, should seem like enough food to feed an active child, and should allow for one “enjoyable” snack agreed upon by the group.  Have the groups discuss whether their favorite foods can or should be fit into their menus.  The groups should document their finished menus and their nutritional values on one paper per group.
  4. Once completed, have the groups share their findings.  Each group should share what foods they chose and how much of each of the nutritional values listed in step number 2.  Students should also share which of their favorite foods could and could not be fit into their menus.

 

Image credit: HockeyPerformanceAcademy

By |February 18th, 2016|5th Grade, Health|

Primary and Secondary Colors (kindergarten lesson plan)

This lesson combines art and music concepts to teach a catchy song that will help young students memorize their primary colors.  They will then translate their knew knowledge to an art activity to explore beyond  the primary colors into secondary colors.

Title of Lesson

Primary and Secondary Colors

Course

Kindergarten Arts

Complementary subject: music

Resources

The Primary Color song for easy remembering of the primary colors:

The Primary Color Song
(sung to the tune of Three Blind Mice)

Red, Yellow, Blue
Red, Yellow, Blue
I see you
Red, Yellow, Blue
You are the primary colors
You make all the other colors
I wish I was a color
Like Red, Yellow, Blue

Standard(s)

ART.VA.I.K.2       Work with materials and tools safely with environmental awareness.
ART.VA.I.K.3       Explore the elements of art through playful sensory experiences.
ART.VA.I.K.4       Prepare, complete, and sign finished artwork.
ART.VA.II.K.1      Explore the basic uses of art materials to produce artwork.
ART.VA.II.K.2      Use a variety of lines, colors, and basic geometric shapes and patterns to creatively express feelings and personal experiences.
ART.VA.II.K.4      Select subject matter and communicate a personal story in a painting or drawing.
ART.VA.II.K.5      Express thoughts and ideas through the creation of artwork.
ART.VA.III.K.4    Describe a personal artwork.
ART.VA.V.K.1       Identify and discuss art in the student’s environment.

Objectives

Students will:

  • Identify primary and secondary colors.
  • Explain how mixing primary colors can create secondary colors.
  • Create marble art pieces to demonstrate their understanding of primary and secondary colors, as well as how to make secondary colors.

Materials

  • Red, yellow, blue paints
  • Several marbles
  • Shallow cardboard boxes
  • Tape
  • Paper plates
  • Smocks
  • Color Palette Worksheet
  • Whiteboard
  • Red, yellow, blue dry erase markers
  • An array of colored markers, crayons, or colored pencils – ensure you have several colors for each child to choose from.

Vocabulary

  • primary color
  • secondary color
  • shade
  • tint
  • hue

Class Time Needed

Lesson can expand across three days, or be condensed into 1-2 long lessons.

Preparation

To minimize on mess, parent volunteers would be a great asset for the marble art portion of this lesson plan.

Lesson Procedure

Day 1: 15-30 minutes

  1. Introduce the concept of primary and secondary colors by discussing red, yellow, and blue.  Demonstrate the colors by coloring circles of each color on the whiteboard using dry erase markers.  This allows students to more easily visualize the lesson.
  2. Discuss how red, yellow, and blue are primary colors. These are the “main” colors that all other colors are made from.  Teach the students the Primary Color song, which is sung to the tune of “Three Blind Mice.”  The lyrics are:
    Red, Yellow, Blue
    Red, Yellow, Blue
    I see you
    Red, Yellow, Blue
    You are the primary colors
    You make all the other colors
    I wish I was a color
    Like Red, Yellow, Blue
  3. Ask students questions about the primary colors, such as: if they have ever mixed these colors together and what colors they have made; how they have mixed colors (using what medium); what happens when they mix two colors, three colors, or all colors together?
  4. Once the students have thought about the colors they have mixed, hand each child the color palette worksheet. Ask students to color circles on their papers of colors and think  about how each color was made.
  5. Have students suggest colors they think are made from mixing other colors; ask the students what colors they think are mixed to make the color they suggested – write the name of the color on the board beneath the primary colors. Discuss how these mixed colors are hues, tints, and shades of the primary colors, and then define each type (hue, tint, shade).  Discuss primary versus secondary colors.

Day 2: 30-60 minutes

  1. Start the lesson by singing the Primary Color song.
  2. Divide students into groups to minimize the number of paint stations in the classroom. Each group should have a paper plate on which you will poor blue, red, and yellow paint.
  3. Each student should have their own cardboard boxes. Cereal boxes with one side cut out work great for this: be sure to tape the sides of the box shut so that a marble can safely roll around in the box.
  4. Have each student put on their smock. Then, put one marble in each color of paint.  Each student should use one marble from each color of paint to roll in their boxes, creating a marble art piece of the primary colors.
  5. To create secondary colors, have each student pick a color they would like to create. For example: a student may saturate a marble in the yellow paint, and then dip it into the red paint as well.  Then, when rolling the marble in the box, they will see how the combined colors create orange.  At this point, it is okay to mix paint colors as they dip – the mess is fun!  As the students create their artwork, encourage discussion about the colors they are making, whether they are primary or secondary, and whether or not they are creating hues, tints, or shades.  Ask students why they chose a certain color, what they like about that color, and what other things are that color.

Day 3: 15 minutes

  1. Start the lesson by singing the Primary Color song.
  2. The marble art pieces should be dry and ready to show off to each other/take them home. Students may discuss with each other or as a whole class the colors they created.

Extension Activity

15-30 minutes

Choose a piece of artwork that is fun to look at and has many colors represented.  Ask students to look for the primary colors.  Then, ask the students to look for secondary colors.  Ask which colors were created to make the secondary colors that they spot.  Subsequently, allow the students to create their own drawing, and have them pay attention to which colors they are using.  Circulate the room and check in with students, asking them which colors they are using, whether they are primary or secondary, and if secondary which colors can be mixed to create the secondary color.

colorbynumber

Image credits: Poissy Design, Printables4Kids.com

By |February 1st, 2016|Arts, Kindergarten, Music|

Physics: Forces and Interactions (kindergarten/3rd grade lesson plan)

This lesson introduces students of any age to introductory physics.  This fun activity leads into a customizable lesson that can be tailored to most elementary grades.

Lesson Title

Forces and Interactions

Course

Kindergarten and/or 3rd Grade Science (physics)

Materials needed

  • hairdryer
  • lightweight ball such as a ping pong ball

Objectives

  • Students will observe the concept of force and its interaction with Earth’s gravity.
  • Students will observe the interaction between higher air pressure and the pull of gravity.
  • Students will develop an understanding of Newton’s law of action and reaction: 3rd law: for every action there must be an equal and opposite reaction.

Standard(s)

Kindergarten: Forces and Interactions, Pushes and Pulls

K-PS2-1:       Plan and conduct an investigation to compare the effects of different strengths or different directions of pushes and pulls on the motion of an object.

K-PS2-2:       Analyze data to determine if a design solution works as intended to change the speed or direction of an object with a push or a pull.

Grade 3: Forces and Interactions

3-PS2-1:       Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence of the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object.

Anticipatory set

  • Kindergarten: use a diagramming exercise to focus students’ attention on the class objectives.
  • Third grade: use brainstorming techniques and a Writing to Learn (WTL) exercises to focus students’ attention on the class objectives.

Introduction

Discuss the concepts of gravity, force, air pressure, action and reaction.

Pose questions to engage students. Have students brainstorm and either write down (grade 3) or discuss (kindergarten) theories that may answer the questions.  Pose more complicated questions to grade 3 students.  Questions may include: How does gravity keep us on the ground? What happens if we don’t have gravity?  How does the concept of force relate to gravity?  How do things float?  Can we make something float despite gravity, and if so, how?

  • Grade 3: Conduct the demonstration and ask questions to further understanding: what do you think will happen to the ball when we put it in the air stream? What will happen if we try to pull the ball out of the air stream?  Why do you think the ball can float?  Is the force of gravity still in effect?  What is the “action” and what is the “reaction”?
  • Kindergarten: Conduct the demonstration and have the students draw what they see. As you discuss action and reaction, have the students diagram using arrows and other symbols to display what they believe is happening, i.e. gravity versus air pressure.

Procedures

  • Angle the blow dryer in an upright position and turn the speed on to its highest level.
  • Carefully position the ping pong ball in the air stream, then let go.
  • Move the blow dryer slowly and carefully to demonstrate how the ball will move in sequence with the blow dryer. (Further thinking #1)
  • Have a student slowly and carefully attempt to move the ball out of the air stream. (Further thinking #2)
  • Attempt to tilt the air stream to one side and see if the ball stays suspended. (Further thinking #3)
  • Have a student attempt to add another ball to the air flow. (Further thinking #4)

Conclusion

As the experiment is conducted, have students hypothesize outcomes for each “Further thinking” application. Use the hook, “What would happen if…?”

  • Explain: the airflow from the blow dryer pushes the ping pong ball upwards until its upward force equals the force of gravity pushing down on it. When it reaches this point, it gently bounces around, floating when the upward and downward forces are equal.
  • Explain: the reason the ping pong ball stays nicely inside the column of air produced by the blow dryer without shifting sideways is due to air pressure. The fast moving air from the hair dryer creates a column of lower air pressure.  The surrounding higher air pressure forces the ping pong ball to stay inside this column, making it easy to move the blow dryer around without losing control of the ball.
  • Compare: What else works similarly to this concept? The outward-flowing air exerts an inward force on the ball, just like the downward flow of air beneath a helicopter exerts an upward force on the blades of the helicopter.
  • What does it mean when the wavy lines on the paper are higher or lower? How could you use that to measure an earthquake?  Example: height of the largest waves indicates the size of an earthquake.
  • How can scientists use seismographs all over the world to pinpoint the location of an earthquake? Think about ripples in a pond or GPS systems.  Example: length of the earthquake record and the arrival times of each wave, the distance of the focus from the recording point can be determined.
  • What parts of the activity emulate how a true earthquake occurs? What are some of the problems an earthquake causes?  Examples: destruction of buildings, larger earthquakes causing small changes to Earth’s orbit, etc.

What to do next time

  • Have the students consider ways to improve the activity, or present new ways to test action and reaction.
By |November 17th, 2015|3rd Grade, Kindergarten, Science|

Let’s Make an Earthquake! (4th grade lesson plan)

This fun, hands-on lesson introduces students to earth science concepts, tectonic plates, and earthquake activity.  Students will create their own seismographs and enact mock earthquakes.

Lesson Title

Let’s Make an Earthquake!

Course

4th grade Earth Science

Materials needed

  • marker
  • plastic ruler that is flexible
  • tape
  • heavy can
  • paper
  • desk

Class objectives

  • Students will learn about the cause of earthquakes.
  • Students will learn about how scientists measure earthquake intensity.
  • Students will build their own seismograph to measure shaking.

Standard(s)

Grade 4 Earth Sciences:     5a. Students know some changes in the earth are due to slow processes, such as erosion, and some changes are due to rapid processes, such as landslides, volcanic eruptions, and earthquakes.

Anticipatory Set

Use three Writing to Learn (WTL) exercises to focus students’ attention on the class objectives.

  • First WTL: have the students write what they know about earthquakes and their personal experiences, if any.
  • Second WTL: have the students research plate tectonics using their textbooks, the internet, and/or the library, then use the information that they find to write a short essay.
  • Third WTL: have the students research seismographs and/or view a video showing how seismographs work.  Students should take notes on what they view to be used for the activity.

Introduction

Begin the class by posing questions to engage students: who has felt an earthquake?  What do we know about earthquakes?  What famous earthquakes have happened in our history? Use the first WTL exercise from the anticipatory set to generate discussion.

Use the second WTL exercise from the anticipatory set to generate discussion.  Explain the concept of plate tectonics and how the outermost layer of Earth, called the lithosphere, is mobile.  When the plates slide over the uppermost layer of the mantle, called the asthenosphere, geological processes take place, including earthquakes.

Use the third WTL exercise from the anticipatory set to generate discussion.  Discuss with students how scientists use seismographs to record when and where earthquakes happen.  Real seismographs are complicated instruments with weights, levers, and motors.  We can make a simple model using these materials (listed above).

Procedures

  • Spread paper out on the table.
  • Tape the marker to one end of the ruler so that it makes a long L shape.
  • Tape the ruler to the side of the can so the tip of the marker is touching the paper.
  • Try gently shaking the table: What happens on the paper?  What happens with smaller or bigger shakes?
  • Real seismographs have rolls of paper that rotate slowly.  Have one person try moving the paper as another person shakes the table.  Can you see seismic (earthquake) waves being recorded?
  • If you shake the table laterally and up and down, how does that affect the image of the waves on the paper?

Conclusion

Have the students use what they have learned via their WTL exercises and apply their knowledge, particularly their notes, to what they learned via the activity.  Answer the following questions in a fourth and final WTL exercise (see WTL listing below):

  • What does it mean when the wavy lines on the paper are higher or lower?  How could you use that to measure an earthquake?  Example: height of the largest waves indicates the size of an earthquake.
  • How can scientists use seismographs all over the world to pinpoint the location of an earthquake?  Think about ripples in a pond or GPS systems.  Example: length of the earthquake record and the arrival times of each wave, the distance of the focus from the recording point can be determined.
  • What parts of the activity emulate how a true earthquake occurs?  What are some of the problems an earthquake causes?  Examples: destruction of buildings, larger earthquakes causing small changes to Earth’s orbit, etc.

Writing To Learn Exercises

Prompt:

Directions:  While watching the video on seismographs, take notes on what seismographs are, what they are used for, and how scientists use seismographs to record when and where earthquakes happen.

Prompt:

Directions:  Using what you have learned from your research, your notes from the video, and the seismograph activity we did together, answer the following questions.

What does it mean when the wavy lines on the paper are higher or lower? How could you use that to measure an earthquake?

How can scientists use seismographs all over the world to pinpoint the location of an earthquake? Think about ripples in a pond or GPS systems.

What parts of the activity emulate how a true earthquake occurs? What are some of the problems an earthquake causes?

What to do next time

Have the students consider ways to improve the activity, or present new ways to test cause and effect using the seismograph in other ways.

 

Image credit: California Academy of Sciences

By |October 27th, 2015|4th Grade, Science|
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